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Sierra Leoneans to stay home in final push to stop Ebola

A usually busy street is deserted as Sierra Leone enters a three day country wide lockdown on movement of people due to the Ebola virus in the city of Freetown, Sierra Leone, Friday, March. 27, 2015. Sierra Leone's 6 million people were told to stay home for three days, except for religious services, beginning Friday as the West African nation attempted a final push to rid itself of Ebola. (AP Photo/ Michael Duff)FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — Sierra Leone's 6 million people were told to stay home for three days beginning Friday, except for religious services, as the West African nation attempted a final push to rid itself of Ebola.


Why I Don't Drink As a Spiritual Choice and Four Practices for More Clarity
When I first met my life partner 10 years ago, he had just quit doing a whole host of things that weren't healthy for his mind, body or spirit. We met in a meditation center, and I soon found out he was struggling with addiction. I didn't have the same struggles with craving alcohol as we began to live a healthy life together.What I had was...

Indiana Couple Expecting 'One in a Million' Triplets
Matt and Ashley Alexander are expecting identical triplet girls who were conceived naturally.

Michigan Man Calls 911 After Mistakenly Eating Pot Brownies
The 58-year-old thought he was having a deadly stroke, but he was actually having a reaction to marijuana-laced brownies his daughter had baked, police said.

White House unveils plan to fight antibiotic-resistant germs

President Barack Obama talks about antibiotic-resistant bacteria as he meets with members of the his Council of Advisers on Science and Technology, Friday, March 27, 2015, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House on Friday announced a five-year plan to fight the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria amid fears that once-treatable germs could become deadly.


Keep Calm and Git 'em Done

Keep Calm and Git 'em DoneYou have about two weeks left before your taxes are due; here are some quick tips to getting'em done, getting any refund you are due quicker, and setting yourself up for next year. Locate your favorite and trusted tax resource. Whether it is a Tax Pro you have confidence in or self-preparation software that you have researched, using a trusted...


The 3 Things That Wreck Your Hormones (Part 3)

The 3 Things That Wreck Your Hormones (Part 3)Part 3 of 3: STRESSIn the last installment, part two of three, we explained how your hormones can be wrecked by aging. This installment will explain the final culprit: stress. Being able to thrive under stress will help you be more resilient so that even when things go wrong, you will remain alert, energized and able to manage whatever comes...


Can Choosing to Eat More Mindfully Free Us From a Dieter's Mentality?

Can Choosing to Eat More Mindfully Free Us From a Dieter's Mentality?What did you have for breakfast the day before yesterday? Do you remember? And aside from what you actually ate, how did you actually eat it? Or were you so rushed to get your day started that you skipped breakfast on that day all together?Too often in our multitasking-oriented society, we rob ourselves of the quiet moments in life that we not...


School Tells 'Tiny' Girl Her Body Mass Index Is Too High
Amanda Moss was shocked by the note given to her 54-pound daughter who stands 3 feet 10 inches tall.

The Affordable Care Act... Your Insurance, Your Problem

The Affordable Care Act... Your Insurance, Your ProblemWhen I was a teen, I recall having the Cadillac of insurance plans. We could go to any doctor, hospital, or pharmacy and wave our insurance card around like it was an American Express black card. Everything was covered. In fact, I remember going to the pharmacy one day to pick up a prescription and being told that I owed a co-pay of fifty...


Google teams with J&J on robotic surgery

Google teams with J&J on robotic surgeryUS health care giant Johnson & Johnson announced plans Friday to collaborate with Google on surgical robotics. "The companies seek to develop new robotic tools and capabilities for surgeons and operating room professionals that integrate best-in-class medical device technology with leading-edge robotic systems, imaging and data analytics," the statement said. Robotics has been used to improve accuracy in operating rooms for around 15 years, including in heart, eye and prostate surgery.


Pelosi irks some allies over bipartisan bill with Boehner

FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2015 file photo, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio is handed the gavel from House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif, after being re-elected for a third term to lead the 114th Congress, as Republicans assume full control for the first time in eight years, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Pelosi is bruising some key liberal allies by helping craft a rare bipartisan accord on Medicare. Lawmakers say it will enhance her deal-making status. And it might help her party avoid being sidelined by majority Republicans on future issues. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi bruised some longtime liberal allies when she worked with Speaker John Boehner to craft a rare bipartisan accord on Medicare. But lawmakers say it will enhance her stature as a dealmaker, and may help her party avoid being sidelined by majority Republicans over the next two years.


UK should cut aid to Nepal if "endemic" corruption persists: report
By Kieran Guilbert LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Britain should cut its 86 million pound ($128 million) aid budget for Nepal unless the country acts to combat poor governance and "endemic" corruption, a parliamentary committee said on Friday. Britain is the largest bilateral donor to Nepal which is one of the world's poorest nations with a quarter of its 28 million population living below the poverty line, according to the World Bank. Funding from Britain's development aid ministry, the Department for International Development (DFID), has helped Nepal make progress in health, water and sanitation in the nine years since it ended a decade-long civil war.

Germanwings co-pilot had serious depressive episode: Bild newspaper

Undated file picture of co-pilot Andreas LubitzThe pilot who appears to have deliberately crashed a plane carrying 149 others into the French Alps received psychiatric treatment for a "serious depressive episode" six years ago, German tabloid Bild reported on Friday. Prosecutors in France, after listening to the cockpit voice recorders, offered no motive for why Andreas Lubitz, 27, would take the controls of the Airbus A320, lock the captain out of the cockpit and deliberately set it veering down from cruising altitude at 3,000 feet per minute. Citing internal documents and Lufthansa sources, Bild said Lubitz spent a total of one and a half years in psychiatric treatment and that the relevant documents would be passed to French investigators once they had been examined by German authorities. Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr told a news conference on Thursday that Lubitz had taken a break during his training six years ago, but did not explain why and said he had passed all tests to be fit to fly.


Senate delays vote on bipartisan bill on Medicare doc fees
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican-run Senate has delayed giving final congressional approval to bipartisan legislation permanently blocking Medicare cuts for physicians until next month.

Wrong kitty litter led to radiation leak at New Mexico nuke waste dump
A radiation leak at an underground nuclear waste dump in New Mexico was caused by "chemically incompatible" contents, including kitty litter, that reacted inside a barrel of waste causing it to rupture, scientists said on Thursday. The U.S. Energy Department report on last year's radiation accident at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad showed that a drum of waste containing radioisotopes like plutonium was improperly packaged at the Los Alamos National Laboratory near Santa Fe before arriving for disposal.

Superbugs could kill a million Chinese a year: economist

Several novel diseases have emerged from China in recent years, including Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and human outbreaks of different strains of bird fluChina faces a million deaths a year from antibiotic-resistant superbugs and a loss of $20 trillion by 2050, an economist and former top Goldman Sachs executive said Thursday. Beijing should "take ownership" of anti-microbial resistance (AMR) when it hosts the G20 summit next year, said Jim O'Neill, the leader of a British government-commissioned review on the subject. O'Neill, former chief economist at the US investment bank and chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management, said that the threat put "China's remarkable economic performance in the last decade and its enormous future potential" in jeopardy. The review, announced last year by British Prime Minister David Cameron, has found that by 2050, drug-resistant infections could cut global gross domestic product by 2.0 to 3.5 percent and kill 10 million people a year around the world.


Senior police official in Fresno, California, arrested on drug charges
(Reuters) - The deputy police chief in Fresno, California, was arrested on Thursday on charges of participating in multiple conspiracies to distribute heroin, oxycodone and marijuana, the FBI said. Keith Foster, 51, was arrested along with three other residents of Fresno, about 170 miles south of Sacramento, an FBI statement said. Two other Fresno residents also face drug charges but have not yet been arrested. "It is important that we do everything we can to maintain and enhance the trust that our citizens have in us," Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer told a news conference after Foster's arrest.

Rugby-Saracens at forefront of on-field concussion research
By Justin Palmer LONDON, March 27 (Reuters) - When Saracens took the field against Newcastle Falcons in the Aviva Premiership last month only the eagle-eyed in the 7,000-strong crowd would have noticed the small plaster behind the ears of their black-shirted heroes. The white sticky tape holds in place a tiny impact sensor that the club hope will produce scientific evidence on the short-term and long-term effects of concussion on professional rugby players. With increased concern over head injuries in a sport of big men and big hits, Saracens, the 2011 English champions and last year's Heineken Cup runners-up, want to be at the forefront of research. "We've been aware, like most people in rugby, for some time that concussion is an issue," Saracens chief executive Edward Griffiths told Reuters.

Rugby-Ten-minute cooler is key concussion advance
By Mitch Phillips LONDON, March 27 (Reuters) - For all the scientific advances and extensive research projects it seems the greatest development in the recognition and treatment of concussion in rugby has been the ability to spend 10 minutes with a dazed player in a quiet room. "Creating the opportunity for players to be taken off to an appropriate quiet environment for assessment has been one of the major changes," Simon Kemp, the Rugby Football Union's head of sport's medicine, told Reuters in an interview. "Ten years ago when a player said he was dazed for a few seconds he probably wouldn't have been viewed as having a concussion. "You don't usually feel any pain with a concussion so it has to be taken out of the player's hands.

Rugby-Concussion worries cast shadow in World Cup year
By Justin Palmer LONDON, March 27 (Reuters) - Rugby officials, fans and television executives revelled in a thrilling Six Nations championship finale but concerns surrounding concussion and its long-term impact on players continue to cast a shadow over the game. The sight of England fullback Mike Brown lying unconscious after a sickening blow to the head or the controversy that surrounded Wales winger George North being allowed to play on after appearing to be knocked out has re-ignited the concussion debate in a sport with bigger, faster players than ever before. Head injuries have long been a concern in America's National Football League, highlighted again this month when Chris Borland, a 24-year-old linebacker with the San Francisco 49ers, announced his retirement. A lawsuit brought by thousands of former NFL players, which is awaiting judicial approval, is expected to cost the league in around $1 billion and there are fears rugby union could follow down the litigation route.

Japan makes a start on sharing lessons from nuclear crisis
By Megan Rowling SENDAI, Japan (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - When professional boxer and model Tomomi Takano heard that children in Japan's Fukushima prefecture were becoming unfit and overweight as the 2011 nuclear crisis there limited the time they could play outside, she decided to use her skills to help. "They really concentrated on the boxing and tried hard," she said at a recent U.N. conference on disasters in the northeastern city of Sendai. The boxer hopes to run more sessions in Fukushima to improve children's agility and provide an outlet for their emotions. Takano and civil society activists in Sendai said they wanted to communicate to the rest of the world the human impacts of the crisis sparked when a huge earthquake and tsunami caused nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi plant to melt down four years ago.

Senate tries to score political points on way to budget vote
By David Lawder WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Senate on Thursday launched a marathon session that will end with a vote on a budget plan after lawmakers weigh in on dozens of amendments that are likely to have more effect on campaign ads in 2016 than the final spending plan. Senators are voting on everything from gun control to sick leave to sanctions on Iran. The marathon session is supposed to be part of the Senate's annual budget ritual, but this is the chamber's first budget vote in two years and only the second since 2009. It drew more than 600 initial proposals, more than twice the number in 2013, Senate aides said.

Dallas Woman Behind Bars for Allegedly Giving Illegal Butt Injections

Dallas Woman Behind Bars for Allegedly Giving Illegal Butt InjectionsA Dallas woman has been arrested for allegedly administering to patients illegal cosmetic procedures -- butt injections -- without a medical license, according to police. Denise Rochelle Ross, known as "Wee Wee," turned herself in to authorities Wednesday because she had been wanted for practicing medicine without a license, according to the Dallas Police Department. Her alleged accomplice, Jimmy Joe Clark, is still at large.


White House crafts first-ever plan to fight superbugs

MRSA bacteria strain is seen in a petri dish in a microbiological laboratory in BerlinBy Yasmeen Abutaleb and Lisa Baertlein NEW YORK/LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The White House is due to issue an ambitious plan to slow the growing and deadly problem of antibiotic resistance over the next five years, one that requires massive investments and policy changes from a broad array of U.S. government health agencies, according to a copy of the report reviewed by Reuters. The 60-page report is the first ever to tackle antibiotic resistance so broadly. A White House official confirmed that it would release the plan on Friday. Doctors and health experts have warned for decades that rising rates of resistant bacteria are leading to tens of thousands of deaths, threatening to nullify modern medical advancements.


Swiss authorities target 'live cell' injection clinics

Swiss health regulators announced March 26, 2015 they have launched a criminal probe into clinics suspected of giving clients potentially dangerous animal cell injections as part of anti-ageing treatmentsSwiss health regulators announced Thursday they have launched a criminal probe into clinics suspected of giving clients potentially dangerous animal cell injections as part of anti-ageing treatments. The investigation targets private clinics and people who have illegally offered the injections which are particularly popular among wealthy Chinese, Middle Eastern and Russian nationals, said the Federal Office of Public Health (OFSP).


Boehner, Pelosi show gridlock is not U.S. Congress's only option

U.S. House Speaker Boehner reacts during a news conference on Capitol Hill in WashingtonBy Richard Cowan and Susan Cornwell WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Maybe it was the kiss that John Boehner planted on Nancy Pelosi's cheek that early January day in front of the entire House of Representatives that should have provided a clue. Not long afterward, Boehner, the Republican Speaker of the House, dispatched a top healthcare adviser to a secret meeting with his counterpart working for Pelosi, the Democratic leader. The Boehner aide's mission, according to a source who asked not to be identified, was to determine whether Pelosi might be willing to collaborate on major legislation. Two months later, after scores of private conversations and hard bargaining, the work by America's political odd couple bore fruit with a 392-37 House vote to overhaul the Medicare program that delivers healthcare for the elderly and disabled, including fixing for good its troubled formula for paying physicians.


Syria has OKed three of 33 U.N. aid access requests in 2015: official
By Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The Syrian government has only allowed the United Nations to deliver aid to three of the 33 sites it has requested access to this year, aid chief Valerie Amos said on Thursday as she urged the U.N. Security Council to take "concrete steps." Syrian troops removed surgical, medical and reproductive health supplies from two convoys granted access, Amos told the council. Medical supplies for just 58,000 people had reached some of the 4.8 million people in hard-to-reach areas, she said. "I ask this council to make it clear to the government of Syria that these convoys must be allowed to proceed and their security forces should allow the free passage of all supplies to people in need," Amos told the 15-member council.

U.S. House okays bipartisan bill to fix Medicare doctor payments

Speaker of the House John Boehner speaks as House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and George Miller listen before the signing the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity ActBy Susan Cornwell and Caroline Humer WASHINGTON/NEW YORK (Reuters) - The U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday overwhelmingly approved a bill to permanently repair the formula for reimbursing Medicare physicians, marking a rare bipartisan achievement and sending the issue next to the Senate. The measure drafted and driven forward by Republican House Speaker John Boehner and Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi would fix a long-standing problem with how Medicare pays doctors. The Senate may not act until it returns from a two-week recess that starts this weekend. Democratic President Barack Obama praised the House passage and said he hoped the Senate would approve the measure too, because he wants to sign it.


Ebola virus has mutated less than scientists feared: study

Medical staff clean their protection suits as part of the fight against the Ebola virus on March 8, 2015 at the Donka hospital in ConakryThe Ebola virus is not mutating as quickly as scientists had feared, which is good news for treating the disease and preventing its spread, a study showed Thursday. "The Ebola virus in the ongoing West African outbreak appears to be stable -- that is, it does not appear to be mutating more rapidly than viruses in previous Ebola outbreaks, and that is reassuring," said Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).


Two experimental Ebola vaccines pass safety test in African trial

Some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion is revealed in this undated handout colorized transmission electron micrographBy Sharon Begley NEW YORK (Reuters) - Two experimental Ebola vaccines, one from GlaxoSmithKline PLC and the other from biotech start-up NewLink Genetics Corp, "appear to be safe" part way through a clinical trial being conducted in Liberia, the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) said on Thursday. The two vaccines, each given in a single injection, are being tested for safety and efficacy on more than 600 people in Liberia in a mid-stage clinical trial sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, a branch of NIH.


Ayurveda for Springtime Balance

Ayurveda for Springtime BalanceHappy Spring! Earth, Water, Fire, Air and Space are the five elements that make up all that exists in our universe according to Ayurveda, the ancient Indian science of life. Look around you and feel inside of yourself. Notice the elements. Can you find anything that is not a combination of the five elements?Each one of us has a unique mind...


Georgia governor to sign bill allowing limited medical marijuana use
By David Beasley ATLANTA (Reuters) - Georgia Republican Governor Nathan Deal will sign legislation legalizing a non-smoking form of medical marijuana for patients with seizure disorders and seven other medical conditions, the governor's spokesman said on Thursday. Deal plans to wait until after the legislative session ends next week before signing it, spokesman Brian Robinson said. The Georgia bill, which was finalized by lawmakers on Wednesday, would allow patients with diseases including cancer and multiple sclerosis to use a non-intoxicating oil derived from the marijuana plant, a strain known as "Charlotte's Web." To legally use the oil, patients or their caregivers must obtain a registration card from the state Department of Public Health. Their physician also must certify that they are being treated for one of the medical conditions covered by the bill.

Widows may have fewer social and financial problems than in the past
By Shereen Lehman (Reuters Health) – - A new Swiss study says that widows and widowers still mourn their spouses as much as ever, but compared to 35 years ago, everyday life is easier, especially for women. Widows, at least in Switzerland, have fewer financial troubles and more social connections than their counterparts in 1979, but widowers still complain of loneliness, researchers found. “Public knowledge about spousal loss in old age has in general a negative connotation -- bereavement is usually seen as an individual issue,” Pasqualina Perrig-Chiello told Reuters Health by email. “However bereaved individuals vary considerably in their reactions to loss, and little is known on how the historical context contributes to adaptation to spousal loss,” said Perrig-Chiello of the University of Bern who led the study.

House OKs bipartisan Medicare doctor bill; fate up to Senate

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio speaks to members of the media during his weekly news Conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, March 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)WASHINGTON (AP) — In uncommon bipartisan harmony, the House approved a $214 billion bill on Thursday permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts, moving Congress closer to resolving a problem that has plagued it for years.


Sugar, Maybe Not So Sweet

Sugar, Maybe Not So SweetBack in 2013, a judge threw out a ban on super-sized sugary drinks that then-New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg attempted to enact. Mayor Bloomberg was ridiculed and even photo-shopped as a nanny.In February 2015 the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Council in its recommendations to the federal government called for a tax on sugary beverages to...


Exclusive: Modi government puts brakes on India's universal health plan

India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi addresses Sri Lanka's parliament in ColomboBy Aditya Kalra NEW DELHI (Reuters) - Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has asked for a drastic cutback of an ambitious health care plan after cost estimates came in at $18.5 billion over five years, several government sources said, delaying a promise made in his election manifesto. The health ministry developed a draft policy on universal health care in coordination with the prime minister's office last year. The National Health Assurance Mission aims to provide free drugs, diagnostic services and insurance for serious ailments for India's 1.2 billion people. The health ministry proposed rolling out the system from April 2015, and in October projected its cost as $25.5 billion over four years.


Just Breathe

Just BreatheShe was the former club champ with formidable groundstrokes, but you wouldn't know it. She'd built a mental block that was crippling her game and melting her self-confidence. Once fluid and powerful, she now staggered anxiously to the baseline, the ball feeling like a grenade in her hand. How'd she get here? Words. Not just words she'd heard...


Dallas Woman Arrested for Allegedly Giving Illegal Butt Injections
Denise Rochelle Ross, known as ???Wee Wee,??? allegedly performed butt enhancement injections without a medical license.

Top European beers to show calorie counts

Four of the biggest brewers in Europe--Carlsberg, Heineken, AB Inbev and SABMiller--back a plan on March 26, 2015 to display the calorie count of their beers on the labelsBeer drinkers in Europe will soon be able to find out the calorie count on their drinks after four of the world's biggest brewers said Thursday that they will list the information. Carlsberg, Heineken, AB Inbev and SABMiller have all backed the plan, said the Brewers of Europe, a trade association representing more than 5,000 brewers. They said the move will show beer is not necessarily the waist-expanding drink it is thought to be, and allow consumers to compare calories with wine and spirits. "We want Europe's consumers to know the ingredients in beer and how these beers can fit within a balanced lifestyle," Brewers of Europe chief Pierre-Olivier Bergeron said.


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