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In Kathmandu Valley, quake-hit Nepalis fend for themselves
By Ross Adkin DHADING, Nepal (Reuters) - Barely any sign of an organized relief effort was visible outside Nepal's capital on Sunday, as aid agencies struggled to fly and truck relief supplies to a country stricken by its worst earthquake in eight decades. In the lush Dhading farming district 80 km (50 miles) outside Kathmandu, people camped in the open, the hospital was overflowing, the power was off and shops were closed. Many people have died," said English teacher Chandra Lama, whose home village lies two hours' drive further west. "We are waiting to see what the government will do." More than 1,100 people - or half of the total confirmed dead in Nepal - were in the Kathmandu Valley, a crossroads of the ancient civilizations of Asia and economic hub of the Himalayan nation of 28 million.

Oklahoma lethal injection drug faces U.S. Supreme Court test

A police officer walks up the steps of the Supreme Court in WashingtonThe U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear arguments this week on whether a drug used in Oklahoma's lethal injection mix should be banned in a case that comes as a shortage of execution chemicals has sent some states scrambling for alternatives. The main question before the nine justices in the case brought by three death row inmates that will be heard on Wednesday is whether the use of the sedative midazolam violates constitutional protections against cruel and unusual punishment. The case does not address the constitutionality of the death penalty in general, but brings fresh attention to the debate over whether executions should continue in the United States. Opponents say midazolam is not approved for use in painful surgeries and should not be used in the death chamber because it cannot maintain a coma-like unconsciousness, potentially leaving inmates in intense pain from lethal injection drugs that halt breathing and stop the heart.


How to Be Happy in a World of Turmoil

How to Be Happy in a World of TurmoilHow many times have you thought to yourself the following: If only I had more money, if only I had someone to love, if only I had a better job, if only I felt better. If only I had that one thing I am missing, I would be happy.Truth be told, following that reasoning you will never attain real happiness. Actually, the opposite effect would...


Get Off the Scale!
It's seems that once again, the public conversation about health has been degraded to weight and appearance.As usual, celebrity women have become the prime targets of jabbing and sometimes devastating comments. This collective social behavior always trickles into the day-to-day lives and consciousness of so many women, fueling insecurity,...

New avian flu viruses send U.S. scientists scrambling
By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - Three highly pathogenic avian flu viruses that have infected poultry and wild birds in the U.S. Midwest appear unlikely to present a significant risk to humans. The H parts, which are highly pathogenic in poultry, originated in Asia, and the N parts come from North American, low pathogenic, avian flu viruses, said Dr. Rubin Donis, an associate director for policy and preparedness in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's influenza division.

Quake triggers Everest avalanche, reports say 18 killed
By Gopal Sharma KATHMANDU (Reuters) - An Indian army mountaineering team found 18 bodies on Mount Everest on Saturday, an army spokesman said, after a massive earthquake in Nepal unleashed an avalanche on the world's tallest mountain at the start of the main climbing season. Nepal's Tourism Ministry could only confirm 10 deaths, but spokesman Gyanendra Shrestha said the death toll could rise, and that the avalanche had buried part of the base camp. He died as a result of head injuries when the avalanche hit, according to a statement from the mountaineering company that had taken him to base camp."We pray too for all those who have lost their lives in one of the greatest tragedies ever to hit this Himalayan nation," Jagged Globe said.Tourism ministry officials estimated that at least 1,000 climbers, including about 400 foreigners, had been at base camp or on Everest when the earthquake struck. April is one of the most popular times to scale the 8,850-metre (29,035 foot) peak before rain and clouds cloak it at the end of May. Almost exactly a year ago, an avalanche killed 16 Nepali guides in what was the single deadliest day on the mountain.

Nepal seeks help, death toll seen rising after devastating quake

Collapsed building is pictured after an earthquake hit, in KathmanduBy Gopal Sharma and Ross Adkin KATHMANDU (Reuters) - Nepal urged countries to send aid to help it cope with the aftermath of a devastating earthquake that killed nearly 1,400 people, a toll predicted to rise as rescuers used their hands to dig for survivors among the rubble on Sunday. Thousands of people braved freezing temperatures and patchy rain to sleep on pavements, in parks or in fields in the crowded Kathmandu valley, too afraid to return to homes damaged by a 7.9 magnitude quake which struck at midday on Saturday. "Our country is in a moment of crisis and we will require tremendous support and aid," he told Indian television. Police said the death toll had reached 1,394, with about 4,700 injured.


Bristol-Myers says hepatitis C drug combination succeeds in study
(Reuters) - Bristol-Myers Squibb Co said its experimental drug cured hepatitis C in over 90 percent of patients in combination with Gilead Sciences Inc's Sovaldi and a commonly prescribed drug, ribavirin, in a late-stage study. Data presented at the International Liver Congress on Saturday showed that the combination cured 94 percent of the patients suffering from hepatitis C after a liver transplant and 83 percent of patients with severe scarring. There were no adverse events observed in the study, Bristol-Myers said on Saturday. Bristol-Myers has been testing the drug, daclatasvir, in combination with Sovaldi after shelving plans to market another hepatitis C drug, asunaprevir, in the United States.

Blast injures two at legal Kentucky moonshine distillery
(Reuters) - An explosion leveled a western Kentucky distillery, authorities said on Saturday, injuring two workers at one of the few facilities permitted by the commonwealth to produce moonshine, a high-octane liquor mostly associated with illegal stills. Distiller Jay Rogers, 40, his assistant Kyle Rogers, 26, were severely burned by a blast and fire on Friday at the Silver Trail Distillery in Hardin, said Frank Murphy, the director of Marshall County Emergency Management. The men were airlifted to Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, where they remained in critical condition on Saturday, hospital spokesman Bill Snyder said.

Dutchman tapped to head UN Ebola mission

A girl walks past a slogan painted on a wall in Monrovia on August 31, 2014The United Nations announced Saturday it has nominated Peter Jan Graaff of the Netherlands as the world body's new chief of mission to fight Ebola. Graaff is replacing Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed at UNMEER, after the Mauritanian diplomat was appointed to special UN envoy for Yemen. Graaff will work closely with Special Envoy on Ebola David Nabarro, along with governments in the region. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon "expresses his sincere gratitude to Mr Ould Cheikh Ahmed for his exceptional work and leadership of UNMEER, and for his commitment to ensuring the affected countries are on the road to recovery from the unprecedented Ebola outbreak," a statement read.


Europe's police crack massive horsemeat trafficking ring

A sample of a meat product is seen in a laboratory to be DNA-tested on February 19, 2013 in BerlinPolice from seven European countries detained 26 people in a crackdown on a horsemeat trafficking ring two years after a tainted meat scandal that rocked the continent, the EU's judicial agency Eurojust said Saturday. The operation involved officers and the judiciary in France, Belgium, Germany, Ireland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Britain, the European Union agency said. Eurojust did not say where the 26 suspects were arrested but the Dutch public prosecutor's office said three were arrested in the Netherlands.


Close the Immunization Gap! Get Vaccinated
Immunization Prevents 2 - 3 Million Deaths a Year Until the second half of the 20th century, the only way a child could become immune to infectious diseases like whooping cough or measles was to actually get the disease and survive it. Too often, however, infection led to tragic, premature death.Today, children all over the world are routinely...

A Practical Running Plan For Beginners

A Practical Running Plan For BeginnersSounds straightforward and easy enough. You're ready to start running and decide to find some good advice on the Web. You plug in your search terms and, uh-oh, information overload. You'll find plans that tell you cross train, plans with speed sessions and hill workouts, plans that emphasize walking, plans for 5k, 10k, and half marathon races....


Women in Business: Nadia Tarazi, Founder, MicroNourish
Nadia Tarazi is the Founder of MicroNourish®, an advanced nutrient system designed to target brain and gut balance for stable moods, mental clarity and a calmer relationship with food. Nadia curates the online magazine, You Are What You Absorb®, and created the coaching app, ThinkPal® -- which generates coaching questions to help people 'get...

Historic tower collapses in Kathmandu after quake
A historic tower built in the 19th century collapsed in the Nepali capital Kathmandu following a severe earthquake on Saturday and at least one body was removed as police cordoned off the area, a Reuters witness said. The Dharara Tower, built in 1832, was a historic landmark that had been open to visitors for the last 10 years and had a viewing balcony on its eighth floor.

Kathmandu hospital says 36 bodies counted so far from quake
(Reuters) - Kathmandu's main civil hospital said 36 bodies had been counted so far after a 7.9 earthquake hit the impoverished Himalayan country of Nepal on Saturday. Nepal's Kantipur TV showed at least 21 bodies lined up on the ground The shallow quake struck west Kathmandu, causing buildings to collapse, injuring many and leaving a pall of dust over the city, witnesses said. (Reporting by Reuters TV; Writing by Nick Macfie)

Farage dismisses health rumours ahead of election

United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) leader Nigel Farage enjoys a pint of beer during a visit to mark St George's day at the Northwood Club in Ramsgate, southern EnglandNigel Farage, the leader of Britain's anti-EU UK Independence Party, on Saturday dismissed rumours he was seriously unwell but said he had been dogged by chronic back pain that has hampered his ability to campaign for the May 7 election. "There were a lot of rumours at the start of this campaign that I was unwell which I denied," he told the Daily Telegraph, ahead of what is shaping up to be Britain's tightest election in a generation. Often seen as being a one-man band fronted by Farage, UKIP is set to play a key role in the election because it siphons support from Prime Minister David Cameron's Conservatives and the opposition Labour Party, potentially preventing either from winning an outright majority.


At least two dead after Nepal quake
At least two people were killed on Saturday when an earthquake measuring 7.9 magnitude struck Nepal and parts of northern India, authorities in both countries said. A 15-year-old girl was killed in northern India after the earthquake brought down the wall of her home in a village near the border with Nepal. Another girl was killed by a falling statue in a town outside Nepal's capital Kathmandu, according to Nepal's state radio.

Washington governor signs medical marijuana overhaul

A production assistant collects a Cannabis plant in a state-owned agricultural farm in Rovigo(Reuters) - Washington Governor Jay Inslee on Friday signed a bill that will overhaul the state's medical marijuana market, reconciling the long unregulated system with the voter-approved recreational pot industry. While marijuana remains illegal under federal law, voters in Washington state and Colorado approved recreational cannabis use in landmark votes in 2012 that ushered in licensed and taxed retail stores offering a range of products to adults. "Today, after tremendous hard work and compromise by legislators on both sides of the aisle, I signed a bill that will create a medical marijuana system that works for Washington." The bill will remove collective gardens that supply medical dispensaries starting next year, in favor of four-person "cooperatives." Some existing collectives will be allowed to continue operating however, if granted a license on the basis of factors such as the applicant's tax history. It will also establish a voluntary database of medical patients and let authorized patients possess three times the amount of marijuana allowed by the recreational-use law.


Hawaii lawmakers pass bill raising smoking age to 21
By Malia Mattoch McManus HONOLULU (Reuters) - Hawaii lawmakers on Friday passed a bill that would raise the legal smoking age statewide to 21, positioning it to become the first state in the country to do so. The bill, which passed the state Senate by a vote of 19-4 after clearing the house last week, would also ban the sale, purchase or use of electronic cigarettes for those under the age of 21. "The activities we've engaged in over the years to manage smoking, our additional efforts in education, the raising of cigarette taxes, this is a continuation of those policies," Democratic state Senator Rosalyn Baker, one of the bill's sponsors, told Reuters. She said opponents of the measure have argued that it limits choice for people considered adults in other situations, like joining the military, but added: "To me, giving someone the choice to have lung cancer is not a good choice." Governor David Ige will have to approve the measure.

Hawaii poised to become 1st state to raise smoking age to 21

Jessica Yamauchi, executive director of the Coalition for a Tobacco Free Hawaii, speaks to reporters after the Hawaii Legislature approved a bill raising the legal smoking age to 21 on Friday, April 24, 2015 in Honolulu. If Gov. David Ige signs the bill, Hawaii would be the first state in the nation to pass such a law. (AP Photo/Cathy Bussewitz)HONOLULU (AP) — A bill that would make Hawaii the first state to raise the legal smoking age to 21 cleared the Legislature on Friday and is headed to the governor.


Amended China law curbs tobacco ads in land of smokers

A man smokes in front of a "no smoking" sign outside a shopping mall in ShanghaiChina's parliament has passed legislation that restricts tobacco advertising in public, strengthening efforts to curb smoking in a country where more than a billion people are smokers or exposed to second-hand smoke. A revised Advertisement Law approved on Friday by the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress, China's top legislative body, bans tobacco ads in the mass media, in public places, on public vehicles and outdoors, the official Xinhua news agency reported. Smoking is a major health crisis for China. Last year, a health official said China was considering raising cigarette prices and taxes.


Japanese man arrested for landing drone on PM's office in nuclear protest

Officials carry a blue box that local media reported contains a drone from the rooftop of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's official residence in TokyoA Japanese man has been arrested for landing a drone on the prime minister's office with a minuscule amount of radiation in an apparent protest against the use of nuclear power, four years after the Fukushima disaster. Unemployed Yasuo Yamamoto, 40, who lives in Fukui Prefecture in western Japan, was arrested on Friday and charged with obstruction of official business, police said. Media reported that Yamamoto turned himself in at a police station in Fukui and said he landed the drone as a protest against nuclear power. A drone marked with a radioactive sign was found on the roof of Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's office on Wednesday.


Software developers try on Apple watch, see more apps coming
Software developers who tried on an Apple Watch for the first time on Friday predicted a rush of new apps over the next few months, particularly in areas including health and messaging. Having the watch on hand will speed development, said Danielle Keita-Taguchi, marketing analyst at Y Media Labs, which has designed apps for companies like American Express, EMC and eBay. Tracking firm App Annie counted 3,061 total apps supporting Apple Watch on Friday. Productivity apps were 8 percent and lifestyle and health/fitness each accounted for 7 percent.

Washington gov. signs overhaul of medical marijuana market

Haiden Day, 6, right, who has Dravet Syndrome, a form of epilepsy that his parents treat with medical marijuana, looks on as Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, left, signs a bill Friday, April 24, 2015 at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash., that overhauls Washington's medical marijuana market. The bill also creates a voluntary database of patients and cracks down on unregulated dispensary sales. Inslee has said the measure is needed now that the state's voter-approved recreational market is in place. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Nearly two decades after voters passed a medical marijuana law that often left police, prosecutors and even patients confused about what was allowed, Gov. Jay Inslee signed a bill Friday attempting to clean up that largely unregulated system and harmonize it with Washington's new market for recreational pot.


Is ice cream safe? Federal health officials say yes
WASHINGTON (AP) — Is ice cream safe to eat? Federal officials say yes, even amid recalls by two ice cream companies after the discovery of listeria bacteria in their frozen confections.

French firm announces multiple sclerosis drug breakthrough

MedDay biotechnology company announced encouraging results for a drug trial that treats multiple sclerosis, a disease that affects the spinal cord and brainFrench biotechnology company MedDay on Friday announced encouraging results for a multiple sclerosis (MS) drug trial, saying it decreased its progress and in some cases led to a "significant improvement" for sufferers. "This is the first time that a drug has been able to decrease the rate of disease progression in addition to improving a significant proportion of patients with progressive MS," said MedDay CEO Frederic Sedel in a statement. The experimental MD1003 drug underwent Phase III clinical trial, the last stage before filing for authorisation to market the drug in the treatment of primary and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. The results of the study, presented Friday to the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, were encouraging, said Professor Ayman Tourbah, the study's principal investigator.


Pepsi dropping sweetener aspartame from diet cola drinks

PepsiCo is bowing to customer demand and doing away with the controversial sweetener aspartame in its diet line of cola drinks in the USPepsiCo said Friday it was bowing to customer demand and doing away with the controversial sweetener aspartame in its diet line of cola drinks in the US. Starting in August, Diet Pepsi, Caffeine Free Diet Pepsi and Wild Cherry Diet Pepsi will be sweetened with a mixture of sucralose and acesulfame potassium, the company said. The blend replaces aspartame, an artificial sweetener approved by the US Food and Drug Administration but which has been plagued by criticism for years that it poses health risks.


Why Surrounding Yourself With Positive People Is 'Crucial' To Your Health

Why Surrounding Yourself With Positive People Is 'Crucial' To Your HealthTake a good look at the people you surround yourself with every day. Are they happy, positive people who make healthy life choices? Or naysayers who drain the energy from the room and drag you down? Not only is it good for our mental health to surround ourselves with positive people, but it's also vital to our physical health, according to...


One Word Could Hold the Key to Health and Happiness

One Word Could Hold the Key to Health and HappinessBy: Dr. Janxin Leu, director of product innovation at HopeLabEudaimonia: If the word is new to you, it might sound like a style of electronic dance music or a pharmaceutical. No, eudaimonia can't be downloaded from the cloud or packaged in a pill. But eudaimonia is a remarkable type of experience that can improve health and well-being, for...


Why Leaders Lack Emotional Intelligence

Why Leaders Lack Emotional IntelligenceOver the past century, the heartless, no-nonsense CEO has become something of an icon--and a cliché--in American society. Hollywood would have us believe that the Machiavellian chief exec is still alive and well. Whether it's the Donald from The Apprentice or Jack Donaghy from 30 Rock, these eat-the-weak-for-breakfast-types seem to be as...


Ohio officials closer to finding source of deadly botulism
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Officials say they are closer to finding the source of botulism that killed one person and sickened many more after a church picnic in central Ohio last weekend.

Drug overlaps, shortages may complicate Teva bid for Mylan

A sign bearing the logo of Teva is seen in JerusalemBy Caroline Humer and Ransdell Pierson NEW YORK (Reuters) - Teva Pharmaceutical Industries' bid for Mylan NV would create a company controlling nearly 25 percent of the U.S. generics market, including drugs in short supply, according to industry experts and a Reuters review of regulatory filings. Teva, the world’s largest generic drugmaker, made its $40 billion offer public on Tuesday and quickly signaled it was ready to sell some overlapping assets to win antitrust approval for a deal. Mylan has not responded to the unsolicited bid but has said it wants to remain independent and that the overlap with Teva's products could scuttle a combination. Previous industry mergers have also reduced capacity, and manufacturing lapses at some plants have delayed or shuttered production, leading to temporary shortages of cancer drugs, anesthesia and other medicines.


Florida Senate passes bill requiring 24-hour wait for abortions
By Bill Cotterell TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (Reuters) - The Florida Senate approved a bill on Friday mandating a 24-hour waiting period for women seeking abortions, with all Republicans voting in favor and all Democrats opposed. The bill is now headed to Republican Governor Rick Scott, who is expected to sign it into law. Senator Anitere Flores, a Miami Republican who sponsored the bill, said it was reasonable for women to wait 24 hours after meeting with their doctors for an "informed consent" briefing on fetal development, which is already required by state law, and undergoing the abortion procedure itself. She noted that state law requires a three-day waiting period for purchasing a gun or getting married, and 20 days for divorces.

Seattle plans $600 million wastewater overflow project
A Seattle utility unveiled a $600 million plan on Friday to stop millions of gallons of untreated wastewater and polluted runoff from flowing into the area's creeks, lakes, the Duwamish river and the Puget Sound. The plan would involve construction of a 2.7-mile, $374-million combined sewer overflow storage system along the north side of the Lake Washington Ship Canal, just miles from an unrelated headline-grabbing $3.1 billion Seattle roadway overhaul that has been fraught with delays. "The plan would also keep millions of gallons of storm runoff out of public waterways, reducing threats to human and aquatic health and the region's quality of life," Seattle Public Utilities spokesman Andy Ryan said in a statement. The 15-year plan aims to fulfill promises Seattle made in a 2013 consent decree with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the state's Department of Ecology to reduce sewer overflows to comply with state and federal law.

HIV cases skyrocket among US painkiller abusers

Illicit injections of painkillers in rural Indiana have triggered a surge in HIV infectionsCases of HIV have skyrocketed among injection drug users in a rural community in the midwestern state of Indiana where 142 people have been diagnosed since the beginning of the year, officials said Friday. Indiana State Health Commissioner Jerome Adams described the current outbreak as "unprecedented," noting that HIV used to be quite rare in Scott County, a community of 4,200 people and just one doctor in southeastern Indiana. Only three new cases of HIV were recorded there from 2009 to 2013. A public health emergency was declared in Scott County on March 26 by Governor Mike Pence.


Indiana HIV outbreak, hepatitis C epidemic sparks CDC alert
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An Indiana county is experiencing nearly daily increases in new HIV infections tied to intravenous drug use, and health officials hope the situation prompts other states to closely track their hepatitis C and HIV rates to identify potential clusters of the diseases.

Material witness in 'maternity tourism' case arrested at L.A. airport
By Dan Whitcomb LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - A woman considered a material witness in an investigation by U.S. immigration authorities into so-called maternity hotels in Southern California has been arrested while trying to flee the country, prosecutors said on Friday. Ying Wu, 31, was taken into custody by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents at Los Angeles International Airport last week while attempting to board a flight to China with her husband and newborn child, U.S. Attorney's Office spokesman Thom Mrozek said. Wu has not been charged criminally in connection with the investigation into the maternity hotels, which cater to foreign mothers-to-be seeking U.S. citizenship for their babies, but she had been ordered by a judge to remain in the United States on an unsecured $1,000 bond, Mrozek said. Mrozek said several others of the some two dozen women identified as material witnesses in the maternity tourism case had fled the country since search warrants were served in connection with the case.

Your Brain on Exercise

Your Brain on ExerciseI am pushing sixty. That is enough exercise for me. -- Mark TwainDiet and exercise. The importance of both was known to the earliest humans, but today we know much more about how food and exercise affects our minds and bodies through scientific evidence. In this two-part series, I will explore the latest science behind diet and exercise and...


Republicans seen scrapping Ryan Medicare plan in U.S. budget push

Ryan arrives to hold a committee hearing on the topic of U.S. economic growth at the U.S. Capitol in WashingtonBy David Lawder WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Aiming to acquire more budget powers and take a swipe at Obamacare, Republicans will likely scrap a proposal that stirred controversy and helped launch Wisconsin congressman Paul Ryan on the national stage: privatizing the Medicare health program. Ryan's bold Medicare "premium support" plan would be sacrificed to ensure passage of Congress' first full budget in six years and allow Republicans a rare opportunity to use a powerful procedural tool to ease passage of other legislation. Dropping the fiscal conservative's signature plan, which had little chance of enactment, is one sign of how the Republican-controlled House and Senate are trying to show they can govern effectively as they seek to win the White House in 2016. Republicans are hoping to use the power known as budget "reconciliation" to pass a bill to repeal or replace President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act, known as "Obamacare," a long-standing goal of the party.


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